Unpopular Opinion Book Tag

So first off, exams are finally over for the both of us and WE’RE BACK. I thought I’d recommence blogging with a really cool book tag I spotted over at tildareads because it’s short and ranty, which pretty much sums up my person (if anyone knows whom this tag traces back to, please let me know, so I can give credit). I love gushing about my favourite reads with others, but sometimes I also like to focus on the books I didn’t like, especially when I feel like the black sheep. Feel free to join in and either do the tag or comment with some of your own suggestions to these questions! 🙂

Continue reading

When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon

When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya MenonWhen Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon
on May 30th, 2017
Genres: Young Adult, Contemporary
Pages: 384
Goodreads

The arranged marriage YA romcom you didn't know you wanted or needed...

Meet Dimple.

Her main aim in life is to escape her traditional parents, get to university and begin her plan for tech world domination.

Meet Rishi.

He's rich, good-looking and a hopeless romantic. His parents think Dimple is the perfect match for him, but she's got other plans...

Dimple and Rishi may think they have each other figured out. But when opposites clash, love works even harder to prove itself in the most unexpected ways.

As joyfully refreshing as Rainbow Rowell, Jenny Han and Nicola Yoon, When Dimple Met Rishi is a frothy, funny contemporary romance told from the dual perspectives of two Indian American protagonists. While Dimple is fighting her family traditions, Rishi couldn't be happier to follow in the footsteps of his parents - could sparks fly between this odd couple, or is this matchmaking attempt doomed to fail?

4 Stars

That moment you realize you’ve been reading a lot of fantasy because you tried to create a section “world-building” for a contemporary (I realized that, unless I was going to judge how well the university campus was described, I wasn’t going to get very far). In the premise on GR, it says, The arranged marriage YA romcom you didn’t know you wanted or needed… Well, I sure knew I wanted it but I didn’t know I needed it. Apparently, I did. This was the perfect read for my exam phase at uni – light but hooking.

When Dimple Met Rishi was one of my most anticipated releases in the contemporary genre, partly because it sounded cute, but mostly because I expected get a great #OwnVoices view on Indian culture. This debut did not disappoint. It may have had some rough edges, since this is Menon’s first novel, but it was every bit the cute and diverse read I expected it to be. 

Continue reading

Anticipated Releases of Summer 2017

Howdy! The anticipated releases is one of our favourite compilations to post because we’re basically brimming with excitement for new releases. Summer is just around the corner, and whether you’re on the northern or the southern hemisphere, I hope the coming months entail sunshine, fruity cocktails, and lots of reading time – and who wouldn’t mind a bit of vacation, right? For this purpose, we’ve put together a list of our most anticipated releases of summer 2017 (summer being June, July, and August where we live). The books are listed in order of publication date (as stated on Goodreads) and clicking on the titles will direct you to the respective Goodreads page (unless, of course, we were lucky enough to get an ARC and review it). We hope you find some intriguing books to keep you entertained at the beach or wherever you’ll be!

Continue reading

Flame in the Mist by Renée Ahdieh

Flame in the Mist by Renée AhdiehFlame in the Mist by Renée Ahdieh
Series: Flame in the Mist #1
Published by Putnam Juvenile on May 16th, 2017
Genres: Young Adult, Fantasy
Pages: 416
Goodreads

From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Wrath and the Dawn, comes a sweeping, action-packed YA adventure set against the backdrop of Feudal Japan where Mulan meets Tamora Pierce.

The daughter of a prominent samurai, Mariko has long known her place—she may be an accomplished alchemist, whose cunning rivals that of her brother Kenshin, but because she is not a boy, her future has always been out of her hands. At just seventeen years old, Mariko is promised to Minamoto Raiden, the son of the emperor's favorite consort—a political marriage that will elevate her family's standing. But en route to the imperial city of Inako, Mariko narrowly escapes a bloody ambush by a dangerous gang of bandits known as the Black Clan, who she learns has been hired to kill her before she reaches the palace.
Dressed as a peasant boy, Mariko sets out to infiltrate the ranks of the Black Clan, determined to track down the person responsible for the target on her back. But she's quickly captured and taken to the Black Clan’s secret hideout, where she meets their leader, the rebel ronin Takeda Ranmaru, and his second-in-command, his best friend Okami. Still believing her to be a boy, Ranmaru and Okami eventually warm to Mariko, impressed by her intellect and ingenuity. As Mariko gets closer to the Black Clan, she uncovers a dark history of secrets, of betrayal and murder, which will force her to question everything she's ever known.

3 Stars

Perhaps the girl wasn’t water, as he’d first thought. Perhaps she was wind. Wind could whip a fire into a frenzy. Make a mighty oak bow. Lash water into the mist.

Having loved Ahdieh’s debut The Wrath and the Dawn, her new project had been thrown onto my TBR before it was even announced what its content was going to be. When I heard it was a story with a feudal Japanese-inspired setting, pitched as  a mash-up of 47 Ronin and my favourite Disney Mulan, I was beyond excited for Flame in the Mist. I don’t know who, for the love of God, pitched this as a Mulan retelling, because except for the girl disguised as a boy, this was nothing like Mulan.

While my knowledge of modern Japan is not too bad, I know very little about its history. So, if you want an informative review on the historical accuracy and rep of feudal Japan, head over to Eri (Airy Reads) to read her review!

Though this book had me well-entertained, Flame in the Mist did not reach the expectations I had built up for this anticipated release. The book’s strong suit was its character dynamics, its feminist touch, and its world-building. I’m also a tremendous fan of the girl-disguised-as-boy narrative. However, there’s potential for improvement for almost every element of the book, be it the depth of the characters, the substance of the plot, or the storytelling. The storyline was unoriginal and shared unmistakable similarities with Ahdieh’s previous work. I could have lived with that had the plot not been so painfully predictable sometimes.

Continue reading

The importance of mental health rep in YA

May is Mental Health Awareness Month (also referred to as National Mental Health Month) in the United States. In accordance, it is also Mental Health Awareness Week in the UK, having started on the 8th, so May is all about mental health right now. Similar to what I’ve been doing on Instagram, I would like to take the opportunity to dedicate a post on our blog to the mental health representation in YA literature, its importance, and its insufficiencies. Mental health (MH) being an important topic to both Chantal and me, we continue to seek accurate representations in various forms; be it the impact of grief, like in Everything I Never Told You, or the reality of suffering from a psychiatric disorder, like in Made You Up which features paranoid schizophrenia.

Continue reading

A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas

A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. MaasA Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas
Series: A Court of Thorns and Roses #3
on May 3rd, 2017
Genres: Fantasy, New Adult
Pages: 705 pages
Goodreads

Looming war threatens all Feyre holds dear in the third volume of the #1 New York Times bestselling A Court of Thorns and Roses series.

Feyre has returned to the Spring Court, determined to gather information on Tamlin's maneuverings and the invading king threatening to bring Prythian to its knees. But to do so she must play a deadly game of deceit-and one slip may spell doom not only for Feyre, but for her world as well.

As war bears down upon them all, Feyre must decide who to trust amongst the dazzling and lethal High Lords-and hunt for allies in unexpected places.

In this thrilling third book in the #1 New York Times bestselling series from Sarah J. Maas, the earth will be painted red as mighty armies grapple for power over the one thing that could destroy them all.

1.5 Stars

As always, people, this is a review of a book and its content, not the personality of its author. My criticism of the book is not meant as an offence to SJM’s person. If you cannot stomach criticism of your favourite author’s work, please just ignore this review, as I don’t care for fangirls shitting all over my opinion – thank you (I used the magic words, so be nice).

Beware: Minor spoilers.

So, after the two previous instalments had kept me reasonably interested in the story, A Court of Wings and Ruin fell utterly flat for me. A Court of Mist and Fury had been a guilty pleasure read whereas A Court of Wings and Ruin was just guilty pleasure. This was mainly due to a lack of a lot of things I had liked about the sequel. Gone were the grounds for new character development, gone were the exciting political twists, gone was the romantic tension between Feyre and Rhys. I think this instalment could have been a lot shorter, more compact, and more interesting. Though I am by no means a fan of SJM’s work, I expected more from this finale.

“You do not fear. You do not falter. You do not yield.
Remember that you are a wolf. And you cannot be caged.”

Continue reading

Characterising your co-blogger!

Last year, a friend of ours created a tag wherein she described herself in five literary characters (unfortunately her blog is no longer live). We loved the idea but found it difficult (and a little odd) to describe ourselves in that way. But then we came up with the idea to describe each other as friends and co-bloggers instead. Albeit presenting quite a challenge, describing and characterising each other was heaps of fun and strengthened our friendship, too. We each picked 5 literary characters for the characterisation, the condition being that these characters shared one or more significant personality trait(s) with the co-blogger. Below, you will find the character compared to the person, which book the character appears in, and a comparison of characteristics. We hope you have as much fun reading this – while slowly getting to know us better through the lenses of our significant others – as we had creating this post! 🙂

Continue reading

Top 5 Wednesday: Books That Would Make Good Video Games

Top 5 Wednesday is a Goodreads group hosted by Lainey from Ginger Reads Lainey and Samantha from Thoughts on Tomes. Every Wednesday of the month, readers and bloggers present their Top 5 Wednesday choices for a specific topic. Today’s topic is top 5 books you’d like to see as video games. Now, I’m going to be honest: I’ve never really played video games (with one exception being The Sims which I adored with all my heart), so I’m not going to be able to give much explanation as to how the game could be constructed or use any technical terms to describe it. But I still really wanted to do this topic. There are some books that I just can’t really see as films or TV series, but I think they’d make perfect games. As always, title links will guide you to our reviews of the book. So without further ado, here are my picks:

Continue reading

A Crown of Wishes by Roshani Chokshi

A Crown of Wishes by Roshani ChokshiA Crown of Wishes by Roshani Chokshi
Series: The Star-Touched Queen #2
Published by St. Martin's Griffin on March 28th, 2017
Genres: Young Adult, Fantasy
Pages: 352
Goodreads

Gauri, the princess of Bharata, has been taken as a prisoner of war by her kingdom’s enemies. Faced with a future of exile and scorn, Gauri has nothing left to lose. Hope unexpectedly comes in the form of Vikram, the cunning prince of a neighboring land and her sworn enemy kingdom. Unsatisfied with becoming a mere puppet king, Vikram offers Gauri a chance to win back her kingdom in exchange for her battle prowess. Together, they’ll have to set aside their differences and team up to win the Tournament of Wishes—a competition held in a mythical city where the Lord of Wealth promises a wish to the victor.

Reaching the tournament is just the beginning. Once they arrive, danger takes on new shapes: poisonous courtesans and mischievous story birds, a feast of fears and twisted fairy revels.

Every which way they turn new trials will test their wit and strength. But what Gauri and Vikram will soon discover is that there’s nothing more dangerous than what they most desire.

4 Stars

I hadn’t read The Star-Touched Queen prior to picking up this companion novel, as the reviews had put me off and the writing in the chapter sampler had completely distracted me from the plot. I was, however, curious about Chokshi’s following work since debut authors tend to improve their skills with each book. Hence, I read this book as a standalone, and though it helps to have read the previous book or the chapter sampler, it is not a requirement. In my case, waiting for the companion novel was the right choice, because I think I enjoyed it a lot more than I would have its predecessor The Star-Touched Queen.

A Crown of Wishes dazzles with its feisty heroine, sizzling romance, intricate world-building, and lyrical writing. From what I’ve heard, the main plot was one of the weak points of her previous work. While this has not changed, the storyline was gripping enough to hook me a few chapters into the book. The romance, though it is borderline overpowering, added to the overall suspension and employed one of my favourite tropes (I am basically a sucker for enemies-to-lovers, I can’t help it).

“Some tales that never end start with something as simple as an act of impulse and end with something as evil as an act of love.”

Continue reading

The Last Star by Rick Yancey

The Last Star by Rick YanceyThe Last Star by Rick Yancey
Series: The 5th Wave #3
Published by Putnam Juvenile on May 24th, 2016
Genres: Young Adult, Science-Fiction
Pages: 338
Goodreads

The enemy is Other. The enemy is us.

They’re down here, they’re up there, they’re nowhere. They want the Earth, they want us to have it. They came to wipe us out, they came to save us.

But beneath these riddles lies one truth: Cassie has been betrayed. So has Ringer. Zombie. Nugget. And all 7.5 billion people who used to live on our planet. Betrayed first by the Others, and now by ourselves.

In these last days, Earth’s remaining survivors will need to decide what’s more important: saving themselves…or saving what makes us human.

2.5 Stars

The Last Star was one of my most anticipated releases of 2016. This book was a complete and utter disappointment, and I cannot even lie to myself about how disappointing it was. This was not the finale I had wanted for one of my hitherto favourite sci-fi series. Hence, the 2.5 stars. Ben Parish was my silver lining, as the Par(r)ishs always are (Raven Boys fans will understand).

Life is a circle bound by fear. The fear of the predator. The fear of the prey. Without fear, life would not exist.

My original review on Goodreads was very detailed and contained minor spoilers, which is why I broke this review down to the basics for the blog. My original (and very ranty) review can be viewed here.

Continue reading

« Older posts
Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial